Media literacy

Media Literacy 101: 1A: NPR

Pedestrians walk past a newsstand with copies of The Wall Street Journal and a front-page story about Russia’s invasion of Ukraine being sold in Los Angeles, California.

FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images


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FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images


Pedestrians walk past a newsstand with copies of The Wall Street Journal and a front-page story about Russia’s invasion of Ukraine being sold in Los Angeles, California.

FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

Earlier this year, we asked you what you wish you had learned in school, but you didn’t.

Our series, “In Case You Missed It,” dives into these topics with leading experts and educators so we can help you catch up. As part of the series, we will talk about civics, finances and nutrition.

But today we’re getting into everything you didn’t learn in school about media literacy and critical thinking.

Here’s how Tammy from Minnesota put it:

“I think they need to teach critical thinking in school and it should be a separate unit, but it should be applied in all other history and science classes and it applies to everything. I think ‘Part of the problem we have in society, in general, is that people accept what they’re told without questioning it and that’s a problem because clearly people are being told lies. “

Critical thinking skills are at the heart of media literacy – and there is a movement to make media literacy a requirement in schools across the country. Last year, Illinois became the first state to pass a law requiring it in all high schools.

We discuss media literacy and how it should be taught. We also discuss what you need to know if you didn’t learn it in school.

Do you like what you hear ? Discover more of our programs on line.


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