Media platforms

Get closer to fashionable designers on social networks

Representative image. | Photo credit: Twitter

Highlights

  • Super Thanks is a pretty simple feature – if you like content uploaded by a content creator on YouTube, you’ll now have the option to show your gratitude in the form of a tip.
  • Earlier this year, Twitter launched its “Tip Jar” feature which allowed users to donate small amounts of money to the platform’s creators.
  • Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg also recently noted that Instagram is working hard to create three new creator monetization features – Creator Shops, Affiliate Commerce, and a “branded content marketplace.”

If you’re a content creator looking to make a living on the internet, why not try getting a following on YouTube? That’s the signal YouTube is sending with the rollout of a new feature called “Super Thank You” that helps content creators better self-monetize. Additionally, bringing in the hugely popular South Korean musical outfit BTS to effectively raise awareness of the feature through a new user challenge unveiled on YouTube Shorts, was probably the perfect way to make a splash.

Super Thanks is a pretty simple feature – if you like content uploaded by a content creator on YouTube, you’ll now have the option to show your gratitude in the form of a tip.

If this already sounds familiar, that’s because it’s not particularly new. In 2017 YouTube launched Super Chat which allowed viewers to send small donations to their favorite content creators in exchange for a shout out. But Super Chats was limited to live-streamed content only. The Super Thanks feature will also apply to recorded content. Super Thanks is the fourth such self-monetization feature that YouTube introduced after Super Chats, Channel Membership, and Super Sticker.

And it points to a growing trend among social media companies – to reward creators for hosting content on their respective platforms in the hopes that by enabling them to build up more paying subscribers, they will become increasingly more loyal to a specific platform.

Everyone seems to get involved in this act.

Earlier this year, Twitter launched its “Tip Jar” feature which allowed users to donate small amounts of money to the platform’s creators. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg also recently noted that Instagram is working hard to create three new creator monetization features: Creator Shops, Affiliate Commerce, and a “branded content marketplace.”

Twitch and TikTok have effectively led the pack in this race, having incorporated various features that close the distance between content creators and their audiences, allowing the former to develop steady and ever-expanding revenue streams.

The rationale for the slew of content creator-centric features unveiled on social media platforms is pretty clear. Every social media platform is in fierce competition with others for user eyeballs and a greater level of user engagement.

They have come to recognize the importance of influencers and content creators in facilitating this. While some have even paid creators to host content exclusively on their platforms, such a model is not sustainable in the long term. But the integration of new tools that help creators earn more money through their subscriber bases does.

Advertising remains the number one source of revenue for all social media platforms, but the opportunities to create additional revenue streams by reducing transactions made directly with content creators while consolidating their user bases are growing. clear. While established content creators may not see the immediate value of these tools, they can be extremely useful for newbie creators looking to expand their footprint in the social media content market.


Source link